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Thread: Official *MLB Season Delayed* Thread

  1. #351
    Administrator revo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gcstomp View Post
    Trout is not a good example, as he will still earn multiple lifetimes worth of money in even a shortened season. Consider the hundreds of players earning the mlb minimum, looks like 555k for 2020. If prorated for 1/2 a season, then that is 277k. If further reduced per no fans, what, it will be below 200k? Heck, the daily mlb union dues of $85 a day becomes more than an annoyance if we keep cutting this down. Is that worth the risks of covid, the wear and tear of travel and playing, and the lost opportunity of maybe doing something else? Maybe for them sitting out is not such a big deal.
    I disagree. For players earning the MLB minimum, even half that would be far more than what they earned as a minor leaguer, plus they might then qualify for MLB benefits, such as the Pension Plan and health care, in addition to showcasing their abilities. Seems like a no-brainer for them to play.

    Trout is a great example because heís also come out and said he didnít care for the Arizona plan and his wife is expecting. And again, if he loses $10m, itís no big deal to him at all.

  2. #352
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    well there you have it. revo says it is no brainer for those taking less than 200 k to play, but clearly trout is a good example of someone who will not play, because 10 mill is nothing. BTW, maybe it is incorrect, but I am seeing Trout 2020 salary as 37.6 mill+, but 10 mill is a good generic number to use for a generic player.

    I am continually staggered by how different 2 people can see same issue. I mean, lets take it from one of the pro's who is publicly stating reluctance to play https://www.masslive.com/redsox/2020...e-to-play.html

    Collin has a family, wife, 2 young kids, this is not unusual at all, the lower paid guys will have at least as much familiy obligations plus older people in their lives as the uber wealthy players. He is saying many players will opt out of playing unless it is safe, whatever that means at this point. I dont think you can really say safe until we have a vaccine. In any case, revo, we agree to disagree, with a side of I am amazed at your pov. But important pov is the players, will they play this year.

  3. #353
    Administrator revo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gcstomp View Post
    well there you have it. revo says it is no brainer for those taking less than 200 k to play, but clearly trout is a good example of someone who will not play, because 10 mill is nothing. BTW, maybe it is incorrect, but I am seeing Trout 2020 salary as 37.6 mill+, but 10 mill is a good generic number to use for a generic player.

    I am continually staggered by how different 2 people can see same issue. I mean, lets take it from one of the pro's who is publicly stating reluctance to play https://www.masslive.com/redsox/2020...e-to-play.html

    Collin has a family, wife, 2 young kids, this is not unusual at all, the lower paid guys will have at least as much familiy obligations plus older people in their lives as the uber wealthy players. He is saying many players will opt out of playing unless it is safe, whatever that means at this point. I dont think you can really say safe until we have a vaccine. In any case, revo, we agree to disagree, with a side of I am amazed at your pov. But important pov is the players, will they play this year.
    Why the snark?

    Yes, I see it as a no brainer. A typical minor leaguer who hasn't made more than $40k in a season suddenly gets a chance to make ~$300K and qualify for permanent lifetime MLBPA benefits and a pension versus the guy who's banked $150m in his career so far and is guaranteed to make another $370m over the next 10 years, who's now being asked to take a 60% discount for his typical services? Who's more likely to raise their hand and say they're in during this shitstorm?

    If you still think that's not the case, there is precedence: just look at the 1987 NFL and 1995 MLB Strikes. In both instances, there were lines a mile long for players who had no qualms about permanently ruining their reputations in being labeled a scab in order to play for minimum wage in their quest for glory. While a strike is different than a pandemic, this virus doesn't affect the young as much, and these players may choose to throw caution to wind in order to start an MLB career.

    I started this with McHugh's comment, no need to rehash it. He's the perfect example of a veteran who's earned a lot of money already and is carefully weighing the risks versus the reward.

  4. #354
    Quote Originally Posted by revo View Post
    Yes, I see it as a no brainer. A typical minor leaguer who hasn't made more than $40k in a season suddenly gets a chance to make ~$300K and qualify for permanent lifetime MLBPA benefits and a pension versus the guy who's banked $150m in his career so far and is guaranteed to make another $370m over the next 10 years, who's now being asked to take a 60% discount for his typical services? Who's more likely to raise their hand and say they're in during this shitstorm?

    If you still think that's not the case, there is precedence: just look at the 1987 NFL and 1995 MLB Strikes. In both instances, there were lines a mile long for players who had no qualms about permanently ruining their reputations being labeled a scab in order to play for minimum wage in their quest for glory. While a strike is different than a pandemic, this virus doesn't affect the young as much as these players may choose to throw caution to wind in order to start an MLB career.

    I started this with McHugh's comment, no need to rehash it. He's the perfect example of a veteran who's earned a lot of money already and is carefully weighing the risks versus the reward.
    Absolutely. And I doubt many who are in their first 1-5 years will give up the service time.

    And I suspect McHugh is wrong about his implication of the numbers of vested veterans who won't show, too. Given how poorly baseball owners have shown to be positioned financially, I suspect many players, even with huge contracts, have similarly mismanaged their money and need to play to get a paycheck, even if notably reduced.
    I'm just here for the baseball.

  5. #355
    All Star Ken's Avatar
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    From a PR perspective, not showing up to work when you get paid hundreds of thousands to millions to play a game is a pretty bad look. Especially with what others are going through for far, far less.

  6. #356
    Triple-A harmon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken View Post
    From a PR perspective, not showing up to work when you get paid hundreds of thousands to millions to play a game is a pretty bad look. Especially with what others are going through for far, far less.
    And besides the bad look I'm pretty sure a no-show Trout is not going to have a positive impact in the Angel's clubhouse and team unity.

  7. #357
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken View Post
    From a PR perspective, not showing up to work when you get paid hundreds of thousands to millions to play a game is a pretty bad look. Especially with what others are going through for far, far less.
    But most places that people are working at ( like me ) do have a policy in place that you don’t “have “ to work. You can’t be fired but you don’t get paid. People who have asthma, kids with medical issues... are not working even tho their place of work is open. So if a ball player is in the same place - should we be pissed at them.

  8. #358
    All Star GwynnInTheHall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken View Post
    From a PR perspective, not showing up to work when you get paid hundreds of thousands to millions to play a game is a pretty bad look. Especially with what others are going through for far, far less.
    I have no issue with any player staying home--I believe this is simply an attempt to recoup monies for the teams (owners/players) rather than some great cause to bring baseball back to the fans. If they don't feel safe, they should be allowed to stay home and in cases like Trout, who's wife is expecting, it's even more understandable.
    If I whisper my wicked marching orders into the ether with no regard to where or how they may bear fruit, I am blameless should a broken spirit carry those orders out upon the innocent, for it was not my hand that took the action merely my lips which let slip their darkest wish. ~Daniel Devereaux 2011

    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.
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  9. #359
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    After one month of playing baseball in empty stadiums, Taiwanese baseball fans will be allowed to attend Chinese Professional Baseball League (CPBL) games starting May 8.

    >>> Games are limited to 1000 fans per game.
    >>> All ticket holders must provide their real name.
    >>> Fans must practice social distancing of six feet apart in every other row.
    >>> Fans have to wear a mask the entire game.
    >>> The CPBL will have temperature screening devices at the gate.

    Photo from Friday's game:


  10. #360
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    Quote Originally Posted by revo View Post
    Why the snark?

    Yes, I see it as a no brainer. A typical minor leaguer who hasn't made more than $40k in a season suddenly gets a chance to make ~$300K and qualify for permanent lifetime MLBPA benefits and a pension versus the guy who's banked $150m in his career so far and is guaranteed to make another $370m over the next 10 years, who's now being asked to take a 60% discount for his typical services? Who's more likely to raise their hand and say they're in during this shitstorm?

    If you still think that's not the case, there is precedence: just look at the 1987 NFL and 1995 MLB Strikes. In both instances, there were lines a mile long for players who had no qualms about permanently ruining their reputations in being labeled a scab in order to play for minimum wage in their quest for glory. While a strike is different than a pandemic, this virus doesn't affect the young as much, and these players may choose to throw caution to wind in order to start an MLB career.

    I started this with McHugh's comment, no need to rehash it. He's the perfect example of a veteran who's earned a lot of money already and is carefully weighing the risks versus the reward.
    I really doubt any of this matters at this point. We don't have the testing and control of Covid to have any realistic attempt to play this year. Places opening up now will mean they will try, but cases will spike (the virus don't care) and everything will have to be shut down. I agree with your point about the veterans versus the young ones---add to that the fact that older people (even 30's versus 21) have more danger from Covid, yeah; I just don't see it happening.

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