Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 46

Thread: What are the keys to human happiness?

  1. #21
    All Star Mithrandir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Belle Vernon
    Posts
    8,453
    Quote Originally Posted by Judge Jude View Post
    "It's always amusing to me when non-parents criticize this generation of parents."

    It's always amusing to me when parents go the route of professional athletes: "You can't question me, because you didn't play in the pros!"

    for some reason, everyone seems to realize how dopey the latter is - but never the former.

    if you had some actual data showing that child abductions are vastly higher now than 40 years ago, for example, then I would have to take a look at that and we could have a dialogue.

    instead, you took a different route - which is interesting, given my response.

    now cue the "but you can't compare those two things because!"

    it's like talking to a brick wall.
    But it's true JJ. If you don't have kids you have not had the experience of having to raise them and nothing can change that. There is no argument about it, it's factual. Sure you can have opinions on how others raise or treat their kids, but until you are 100% responsible for another life, it isn't the same. Mr Wall.
    "I lingered round them, under that benign sky: watched the moths fluttering among the heath and harebells, listened to the soft wind breathing through the grass, and wondered how any one could ever imagine unquiet slumbers for the sleepers in that quiet earth."

  2. #22
    All Star Mithrandir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Belle Vernon
    Posts
    8,453
    Quote Originally Posted by TranaGreg View Post
    I used to think that happiness was largely genetic - that is, if one is predisposed to being unhappy they'll bitch about their roach-infested apartment about as much as they would about the dust on the grand piano that the maid missed.

    I'm not sure I believe that as much anymore ... but I think there's still some truth there. I do think that there's a strong relationship tho between safety & happiness (not just security, but safe from judgement or other things that might make one feel vulnerable).
    I still believe this is a large factor in individual happiness. I also believe that positive or negative life experiences can alter the brain chemistry and affect one's happiness/disposition.
    "I lingered round them, under that benign sky: watched the moths fluttering among the heath and harebells, listened to the soft wind breathing through the grass, and wondered how any one could ever imagine unquiet slumbers for the sleepers in that quiet earth."

  3. #23
    Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    28,740
    Maybe we need to define happiness before we can recognize what it is or how to get it.

    Where should happiness be on life's goal list?

  4. #24
    Hall of Famer B-Fly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Montclair, NJ
    Posts
    47,557
    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg View Post
    Maybe we need to define happiness before we can recognize what it is or how to get it.

    Where should happiness be on life's goal list?
    I see happiness as, first and foremost, one's subjective sense of well being or contentment, either in a moment or averaged across time. That subjective sense may well be driven by or reflected in biology/chemistry/electricity in the form of things like dopamine, endorphins, oxytocin, but it's still ultimately a subjective sense about oneself.

    As to where it should be on life's goal list, two points. There's the arguably selfish component of where one's own personal happiness should rank among, say, the welfare or happiness of others, the betterment of society, serving country or "G-d", etc. And then there's the broader question about where maximizing human happiness should rank among the goals of human societies. I think it ranks reasonably high in both cases, but was more focused on the latter societal question than I was on the individual question.

  5. #25
    Journeyman TranaGreg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    downtown
    Posts
    4,398
    Quote Originally Posted by B-Fly View Post
    ... And then there's the broader question about where maximizing human happiness should rank among the goals of human societies. I think it ranks reasonably high in both cases, but was more focused on the latter societal question than I was on the individual question.
    This seems like overstepping to me. I think that society should be structured to allow for individuals to have safety & security & pursue their interests with their basic needs met (assuming that this doesn't go against the social contract ... which is of course another thread, altho related). But whether that leads to increased happiness isn't a KPI that I think should be used to assess how good or bad a given society is doing; there are simply too many other variables at play.

  6. #26
    Big Leaguer TS Garp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,509
    Interesting topic. I highly recommend reading Why Buddhism is True by Robert Wright. Also, regarding the (over)parenting angle, How to Raise an Adult by Julie Lythcott-Haims is very worthwhile. Here's her TED talk on the same subject:

    https://www.ted.com/talks/julie_lyth...ng?language=en

  7. #27
    Journeyman The Feral Slasher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    4,545
    Quote Originally Posted by DMT View Post
    Happiness, like you said in the OP, is largely chemical and the difference between expectations and reality. Look at Anthony Bourdain, guy had a life that millions would trade for in a heartbeat, and he killed himself. Social bonds certainly are not a requirement, many monks lead happy fulfilling lives, mostly in solitary meditation.
    That's an interesting point. I'm not sure if there's any data on happiness of monks. I suppose they could be happier than average. I suspect that for most people who aren't monks that personal relationships/social bonds are pretty important.

  8. #28
    Welcome to the Big Leagues, Kid In the Corn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Minneapolis...close to Hornsby
    Posts
    1,573
    I would posit one of the keys to human happiness is naivete. The more knowledge we have the more we have to grapple with mentally and spiritually. There also is a physical toll to that as well.

    I would also say one's ability to live an "it is what it is" lifestyle. The realization that you should only worry about the things you can control, and that really isn't much.

    I think every era, every station in life, and every literal age of life provides a different idea of what happiness is all about.

    I also think happiness comes from not comparing ourselves to others. There is always going to be a "Jones" who is one-upping you.

    ~~~~~

    And JJ, as a parent, I don't think you are completely off on what you stated. Now, get off my lawn!.
    "Looks like I picked a bad day to give up sniffing glue.
    - Steven McCrosky (Lloyd Bridges) in Airplane

    i have epiphanies like that all the time. for example i was watching a basketball game today and realized pom poms are like a pair of tits. there's 2 of them. they're round. they shake. women play with them. thus instead of having two, cheerleaders have four boobs.
    - nullnor, speaking on immigration law in AZ.

  9. #29
    Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    28,740
    Raising a child is like preparing for a fantasy baseball auction. Always a plan until the first name comes out.

  10. #30
    All Star DMT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    9,537
    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg View Post
    Raising a child is like preparing for a fantasy baseball auction. Always a plan until the first name comes out.
    And each one is completely different.
    If DMT didn't exist we would have to invent it. There has to be a weirdest thing. Once we have the concept weird, there has to be a weirdest thing. And DMT is simply it.
    - Terence McKenna

    Bullshit is everywhere. - George Carlin (& Jon Stewart)

    How old would you be if you didn't know how old you are? - Satchel Paige

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •