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Thread: i gave my first wise-ass answer to a school test today

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    Big Leaguer nullnor's Avatar
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    i gave my first wise-ass answer to a school test today

    we had out midterms in mod 1 today. i got a 100. 20 questions i got one wrong but i got the bonus answer. but since i came late i haven't taken the very first test on electrons. the one i got wrong was about outlets. i was supposed to draw and label an electrical outlet plug. you have L1 or hot in the right side small slash and neutral (or is it common) on the bigger slash left and i think the bottom hole is ground. but they just wanted voltage readings.

    after i took the electron test. easy enough right. i mean shit i may start telling you that electrons are big elementary particles. positrons are their anti-matter counterpart. i wanna say they are leptons. i got a 90 on that test. not bad seeing i hadn't even joined the school yet.

    the question i got wrong was what are the 4 best conductors of electricity?

    not exactly quantum physics. so what would i do having no idea or notes since i wasn't there the first week. i thought wire. that's a conductor. i briefly thought maybe magnets, but i chickened out. so then i wrote loads and atoms. i knew capacitors are conductors, that still would've been the wrong answer. so then i wrote EARTH, WIND AND FIRE.

    the teacher was like earth, wind and fire? and i said right on bro. and had me come up to his desk and mark it wrong because he said he refused to do it. the class is more black and latino maybe than white. i guess most of the black kids were out of class at the time and missed it. i don't know. they are too young to know who Earth, Wind and Fire is anyways.

    the correct answer was gold, silver, copper, and aluminum. even though i looked at him and said platinum. actually i think platinum is better than aluminum. but if you take cost..

    so i got that going for myself...


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    Big Leaguer nullnor's Avatar
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    so i am actually outside in the daytime now these days frolicking around in the world. god help everyone. lol

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    Big Leaguer nullnor's Avatar
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    lol, so i have to write a summary report on certain topics of 150 words, and include a picture for school. fairly easy. this school isn't about theory. they just teach you the shit you need. i didn't want to write it about Tesla but it's due Thurs. so i got drunk and sat down and did what i always do, think about cool stuff on rotojunkie. i was just gonna write some shitty essay but, maybe if i gave myself more time.

    ------------
    In the 1986 movie comedy Ferris Bueller's Day Off the lead actor says, " Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it". It has been stated that some of the best discoveries and inventions were first imagined during moments when you stop and look around. Sir Issac Newton discovered gravity sitting under an apple tree and one fell. Neils Bohr thought about how horses running at a race track in lanes were like electrons orbiting a nucleus and restricted to energy levels. Dimitri Mendeleyev discovered and solved parts of the periodic table after he said he saw basic chemical elements relating to each other like themes in music. Albert Einstein credits some of his insights into general relativity with picturing himself sledding down a mountain and having stars change their position relative to his speed.

    In 1881 Nikola Tesla moved to Budapest, at age 25 he had just spent the last 6 years of his life thinking about the limits of direct current and DC motors being demonstrated around the world. Alternating current had been discovered, but unlike DC, a practical motor had yet to be invented. He thought about electromagnetic fields and a how hypothetical motors could be powered by alternate current. One day while walking through a park with a friend and reciting poetry he stopped, picked up a stick, and drew a diagram in the dirt of a motor using rotating magnetic fields created by multiple alternating currents. A few years later he invented his induction motor.

    I wonder how many inventions and discoveries were made like this, stop and look around. I suppose you could say Charles Darwin probably did that a lot, ha. I have a 500 page book called The Complete Patents of Nikola Tesla, but that is not why I admire him. He may be the father of the induction motor, but he is also, like Einstein, watching the stars change their position relative to his own speed. Tesla lived the last 30 years of his life being famous, essentially penniless and feeding pigeons in NYC. He sold the manufacturing rights to his motor to George Westinghouse for $65,000 so that Westinghouse could compete and because he wanted civilization to benefit as much as we could from alternating current; and Westinghouse took care of Nikola. He paid his hotel bills and loaned him money when Tesla needed some. Westinghouse was in direct competition with Thomas Edison and you might say it was a time when civilization would voir dire AC and DC electricity. The electric current wars, Tesla didn't like Edison. Earlier in his career he first went to work for Edison and was offered $50,000 if he could improve the DC motors he used. A short time later Tesla notified Edison about improvements but was never paid.

    Tesla was one of the most prolific inventors of mankind. The limitless of his imagination was truly staggering. He invented neon and fluorescent lighting, robot machines, power transmission, radio control. He demonstrated remote control before Marconi. He predicted radio and television, and his Tesla coil is in every automobile ignition system. He discovered the heating effect of shortwave currents on the human body and suggested their use in treating diseases. At the beginning of World War I, Tesla described a means for detecting ships at sea. His idea was to transmit high-frequency radio waves that would reflect off the hulls of vessels and appear on a fluorescent screen. The idea was too far ahead of its day, but it was one of the first descriptions of what we now call radar. He predicted guided missiles. Wars that would one day be fought by robots.

    Some of my favorite Tesla inventions are the cyclotron or atom smasher. Yes, he demonstrated one. Also, the resonant Tesla oscillator. Also, he had a distaste for ball lightning. During his experiments he would encounter the strange phenomenon of ball lightning and instead of solving it, he would curse it. But if anyone could he could've. Sure the idea of wireless power was 200 years behind. And even if we tried it now and used earth as a conductor, many manhole covers would beg to differ. Yet, the idea of wireless power is still in it's infancy.

    No, it's not all those things that make Nikola Tesla great. It's only when you take a greater scope and surroundings, when you stop and look around, and you can appreciate what happened 130 years ago. Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse won widespread praise for their genius and inventions that helped form the foundation of today's electrical grid. Yet, Tesla is a tragic figure who arguably contributed just as much but spent his last years broke. During the electrical current or ampere war, if he had held onto his invention he would've died one of the richest men in the world. There is no doubt about that. But the royalties from his invention were bankrupting his friend George Westinghouse. The ampere war with Thomas Edison was costly business. So he signed it all over to Westinghouse.

    Tesla was more cerebral. It was like he inhabited the world of philosophy As prolific as he was, he was a dreamer. Tesla liked to conceptualize and work things out in his head. He cared more about the idea than its practical exploitation. Edison started with the commercial potential and would repetitively test things out with physical investigation. Tesla would say about Edison, he would spend days in a haystack until he found a missing needle, when instead he could've spend hours and do it mathematically.

    Yet how we remember history isn't always fair. Beauty is always in the eye of the beholder.

    People appropriate all kinds of stories about Nikola Tesla. Perhaps he would stand outside in a thunderstorm with thimbles on his fingers. He was also a showman when times called for it, and a recluse. If you've ever seen the 1990 movie Home Alone, you've seen the scene when the park woman fed pigeons. That was him. In the park in NYC he blew a low whistle, usually after midnight, and the birds gathered from all over. Some perched on his head, some on his shoulders and arms, while others gathered on the ground before him. A few ate seeds out of his hands. He had many idiosyncrasies. He wouldn't talk to women that wore pearls. He avoided shaking hands. He sprayed messenger boys with antiseptic before accepting packages from them. But he regarded pigeons and animals differently. Sometimes I think he humored people by stating that the hotel he died in could have the death ray in the box next to his bed as payment.

    One story says that while feeding pigeons Tesla noticed and befriended a pure white bird with light grey tips on her wings. No matter where he went this pigeon would find him. If he wanted her, he had only to think about her and she would show up. He felt that he could always accomplish anything he began, no matter how ambitious the scheme. And I sometimes think about how birds use quantum physics to biologically navigate earths magnetic field and think perhaps that's the contributed to the connection. One night when he was sleeping the pigeon flew in his hotel room window. She was dying as all pigeons eventually do. He said that he felt like she was trying to tell him. And a bright light than any he saw in a laboratory came from her eye's.

    And this is why you can never explain reality. It's metaphysical and subjective. No matter how much electrons can be predicted and put to work, you cannot explain how the wind blowing in your face can be experienced or felt. And history is truly flabbergasted how one of the greatest inventors and giants ended up alone and broke.

    "Day after day I have asked myself 'What is electricity?" - Nikola Tesla after petting his childhood cat Macak.

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