Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 32

Thread: Bill Belichick's place in sports history

  1. #21
    these articles make about as much sense to me as the debates about "which cap" goes on the player's HOF plaque.
    heading into my 36th year in same 12-team NL 5x5
    AVG collapse last Sept left us finishing 4th
    won in 2017 15 07 05 04 02 93 90 84

    UPDATED! 2019 keeper candidates (can keep up to 11)
    SP Kershaw 42, AWood 5, CSmith 1
    RP Jeffress 1, Dominguez 10, Knebel 2
    C Realmuto 13, 3B Longoria 15, 2B Kendrick 8, 2S Hanson 10
    OF Harper 41, Eaton 18, CarGo 14, FCordero 10

  2. #22
    Big Leaguer The Feral Slasher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    3,559
    Quote Originally Posted by Judge Jude View Post
    these articles make about as much sense to me as the debates about "which cap" goes on the player's HOF plaque.
    I disagree

  3. #23
    Big Leaguer TS Garp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,399
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Seitzer View Post
    I think Williams would be more prepared to face today's pitchers than Ruth would be, in the same situation where they are dropped in and have days or weeks to prepare as opposed to years. But I think he would suffer from many of the same issues to a lesser degree.
    Is there a hitters from a different era whose swing/approach you think would more easily translate?

  4. #24
    Big Leaguer Kevin Seitzer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,643
    Quote Originally Posted by TS Garp View Post
    Is there a hitters from a different era whose swing/approach you think would more easily translate?
    In terms of swing path, I think Cobb's would work well today. But I think anyone from before the 1970s or so would struggle with the slider and anyone from 30+ years ago would probably have some trouble adjusting to the velo because they hadn't seen it. Guys like DiMaggio had a pretty quick, compact swing. He'd probably be okay. Maybe Rose, too.
    Brett, Carew. I'm sure there are more. I've only studied video of some of them.
    "There was nothing for him to do under the truck, but it's tough to blame him now that he is dead." -V.Erps 3/26/2005

  5. #25
    Big Leaguer The Feral Slasher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    3,559
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Seitzer View Post
    In terms of swing path, I think Cobb's would work well today. But I think anyone from before the 1970s or so would struggle with the slider and anyone from 30+ years ago would probably have some trouble adjusting to the velo because they hadn't seen it. Guys like DiMaggio had a pretty quick, compact swing. He'd probably be okay. Maybe Rose, too.
    Brett, Carew. I'm sure there are more. I've only studied video of some of them.
    Dimaggio, Mays, Burkett, Latham.... possibly others.

  6. #26
    Big Leaguer Kevin Seitzer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,643
    Charlie Lau's book The Art of Hitting .300 is the best on the topic. It's out of print but you can find used copies. Williams' The Science of Hitting is all the rage now, and it's a good book, too, but Lau understood and explained the technical aspects of hitting far better than anyone. It's no accident he was filming hitters with high-speed cameras back in the 1970s.
    "There was nothing for him to do under the truck, but it's tough to blame him now that he is dead." -V.Erps 3/26/2005

  7. #27
    Big Leaguer TS Garp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,399
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Seitzer View Post
    Charlie Lau's book The Art of Hitting .300 is the best on the topic. It's out of print but you can find used copies. Williams' The Science of Hitting is all the rage now, and it's a good book, too, but Lau understood and explained the technical aspects of hitting far better than anyone. It's no accident he was filming hitters with high-speed cameras back in the 1970s.
    Thanks, will check it out. Sounds a bit like the Bill Walsh coaching book, which is hard to find but supposedly the holy grail of modern coaching.

  8. #28
    Big Leaguer TS Garp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,399
    Out of curiosity, have we been able to approximate how hard pitchers were throwing in Ruth's era? Re: Williams' era -- supposedly, Feller was throwing over 100, right?

  9. #29
    Big Leaguer Kevin Seitzer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,643
    Quote Originally Posted by TS Garp View Post
    Out of curiosity, have we been able to approximate how hard pitchers were throwing in Ruth's era? Re: Williams' era -- supposedly, Feller was throwing over 100, right?
    Not reliably, no. I don't trust any of the velo measurements made before the introduction of the radar gun in the 1960s (and really late 1970s before it was in widespread usage).
    "There was nothing for him to do under the truck, but it's tough to blame him now that he is dead." -V.Erps 3/26/2005

  10. #30
    Big Leaguer Kevin Seitzer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,643
    Bob Feller's fastball was variously measured at 104 mph, 107.9 mph, and 98.6 mph. You tell me whether that gives you confidence in the measurement methods.
    "There was nothing for him to do under the truck, but it's tough to blame him now that he is dead." -V.Erps 3/26/2005

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •