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View Full Version : Your job...would you do it all over again?



Mithrandir
02-26-2011, 05:24 PM
If you could do it all over again, would you choose the same profession you are in?

Would you want the same job you currently have?

I love my job as a Public library director and would 100% choose this career if i had to choose a career all over again.

Lucky
02-26-2011, 05:47 PM
If you could do it all over again, would you choose the same profession you are in?

Would you want the same job you currently have?

I love my job as a Public library director and would 100% choose this career if i had to choose a career all over again.

I wouldn't change anything in my life that would mean I wouldn't have my wife and kids, but...it that wasn't a consideration, no I wouldn't take the same career path.

I love my job now as a judge, but not the 25 years of legal practice which preceded it. (Of course, I couldn't have become a judge without the legal career.)

Some of the things that come to mind...teaching, coaching, working for a newspaper...if realism isn't required, baseball player, musician, inventor, chef, novelist.

Moonlight J
02-26-2011, 06:05 PM
I miss teaching terribly and I'm currently utterly dissatisfied with my current job despite my very fair compensation. The more I get into sportswriting the more I wish I would have taken a more traditional journalistic track.

Lucky
02-26-2011, 06:23 PM
I miss teaching terribly and I'm currently utterly dissatisfied with my current job despite my very fair compensation. The more I get into sportswriting the more I wish I would have taken a more traditional journalistic track.

The reason I put "working for a newspaper"...after my first year of law school, I managed to get a summer job as an intern for a newspaper in the NE corner of the state, 300 miles from the U of A. It was a great summer, and I learned about every part of newspaper operations, from being a reporter, a photographer, layout, printing, subscription, delivery...you name it. When I got ready to go back to law school, they asked me if I would be a stringer for them and cover Razorback sports, since they were dissatisfied with the wire services. For two years, I had full press credentials for every football game, basketball game, press conference, or other sports media event at the U of A. I covered the games, shot the games, and even had a weekly column. It was the most fun job I ever had.

The morning after graduation, I was awakened by a call from my managing editor, offering me a full-time job. I've always wondered what would have happened had I said yes, but after three long years of law school I thought I should probably give law a try.

I would love to trade places with you for a few months. I don't think I could do your job, but it would be a lot of fun trying.

revo
02-26-2011, 08:32 PM
I was a journalism student and managing editor of the college paper, but decided at the time to abandon it because it was all about unpaid internships, working at tiny papers in tiny locales, etc. What a putz I was.

If I could do it all over again I would definitely go into journalism, without a doubt. My fellow college newspaper buddies have gone on to be editors at the NY Times, ESPN Magazine, Sports Illustrated and Marvel Comics, among others.

amcg
02-26-2011, 08:51 PM
f**k no

My "career", such as it has been, has been disastrous.

Branching out into some new things to keep me sane.

GwynnInTheHall
02-26-2011, 09:58 PM
I'd do the same thing, only do it better.

TranaGreg
02-26-2011, 10:28 PM
I'd definitely have gone down a different path - I would have gone into medicine, probably neurology.

Judge Jude
02-26-2011, 10:52 PM
I actually had posted something, but given the economy and other things, felt like "yeah, all I ever dreamed of and then some" seemed kind of obnoxious.

I will say that there is some "grass is always greener" - I've also given up a lot, in many ways, to do just what I wanted. Many many people who didn't stick with journalism wound up making a lot more money and having a lot more perks - things I think they have gotten so used to that it would be tougher to "make that trade" than they think. Plus the field in sports is so crowded that even really talented people can wind up getting nowhere. You have to be both good AND lucky.

I would definitely do it over again, but a lot of really good, less lucky people would probably have a very different story to tell.

Fresno Bob
02-26-2011, 10:54 PM
I'm working my dream job, making more money than I ever have, at a stable company, so no, I don't think I'd do it much differently....

Judge Jude
02-26-2011, 11:34 PM
see, that's just the kind of the post I wanted to avoid!

;)
I kid.

revo
02-27-2011, 12:37 AM
I actually had posted something, but given the economy and other things, felt like "yeah, all I ever dreamed of and then some" seemed kind of obnoxious.

I will say that there is some "grass is always greener" - I've also given up a lot, in many ways, to do just what I wanted. Many many people who didn't stick with journalism wound up making a lot more money and having a lot more perks - things I think they have gotten so used to that it would be tougher to "make that trade" than they think. Plus the field in sports is so crowded that even really talented people can wind up getting nowhere. You have to be both good AND lucky.

I would definitely do it over again, but a lot of really good, less lucky people would probably have a very different story to tell.

I hear ya, JJ. And I agree with you. But I wish I would've done differently back then.

Frankly, I wish either my parents or my college were better advisors. I still blame myself for anything, but I have to admit I had no one really influencing my decisions. I wish I had gone to grad school right after college, but no one had advised me how important that may have been then. My parents were ecstatic to simply have a college grad (neither had much college experience), and my school really didn't push the advisor angle (at least not that I was aware of, and I was VERY active in extra-curricular activities.)

So for better or worse, had I either gone for an MBA immediately or gone into what my major/minor was (history/journalism), I probably would have been far happier with my career to date, damn anything else.

Don Quixote
02-27-2011, 06:05 AM
I have a lot "if only"s, but mostly missed opportunities. My biggest regret is that I feared going into debt for my education, and decided not to go to grad school right after I got my degree. Many people tried to guide me into law as a career, but I preferred to keep my self-respect (plus I couldn't stand the folks with whom I went to college who were going into law).

I could have pursued a degree in journalism, but deep down I knew three things that worked against that--one, I was a better editor of the words of others than I was a writer; two, my politics were too centrist for most newspapers and magazines; and three, that I was remarkably non-telegenic.

So I wound up in my major, accounting, and discovered that to a lesser degree, self-respect goes out the window at times, and it doesn't pay nearly as well as law can. ;) And when I worked for a newspaper (ironically enough), I was fed a steady diet of sh** and had to abandon my self-esteem completely.

It's been a living. I like some of the work and some of the people, but if my current job ended after this tax season, I'd take a year off, get a passport, pack a big backpack, and wander around Europe. Eventually, I'd have to come back and get another job, but it would be nice to leave it all behind for a while. Over thirty years in the same field can do that to a person.

Fresno Bob
02-28-2011, 12:41 AM
see, that's just the kind of the post I wanted to avoid!

;)
I kid.

no arguement here, I'm good and lucky, and I'll be the first to say it, my wife is my backbone and chief strategist and is the primary reason I've been able to thrive in a fairly ruthless corporation

Fresno Bob
02-28-2011, 12:43 AM
I have a lot "if only"s, but mostly missed opportunities.....It's been a living. I like some of the work and some of the people, but if my current job ended after this tax season, I'd take a year off, get a passport, pack a big backpack, and wander around Europe. Eventually, I'd have to come back and get another job, but it would be nice to leave it all behind for a while. Over thirty years in the same field can do that to a person.

then do it, you can.....

Teenwolf
02-28-2011, 05:47 AM
I have a pretty great job, I think. As a landscaper in Vancouver, I get around 9 months of work in perfect weather. I get to stay active, and still have a winter layoff in which unemployment pays my bills.

My one regret is that I can't leave the west coast. My daughter lives in Ontario, and there's no work in her hometown. I may end up going back at some point, but I'd very likely be taking on a minimum wage job, given how specialized my work history is, and the lack of work in that field back home.

I also have to weigh whether she'd rather see her father miserable every 2nd weekend or have her college education paid for while seeing me twice a year or so.

B-Fly
02-28-2011, 11:32 AM
I became a political science major thinking I wanted to find a career where I could drive important societal change, whether globally, nationally or locally. When I couldn't see a clear path to that out of college, I went to law school thinking it would get me to such a career. After two great judicial clerkships, I fell into a law firm where I successfully made the money necessary to pay off my loans, but otherwise found myself with no passion whatsoever for the work. But the problem wasn't really law or litigation - it was the subject matter of the litigation - mostly Wall Street/high finance stuff, with us representing rich corporate officers and directors. That's what I hated. I was really impressed with one of the partners at the firm, however, and when he left the firm to become Auditor General of the NYC public schools, the firm became an even drearier place for me.

I had always been passionate about public education, coming from a family of teachers, but also having become deeply impassioned and engaged in the debates about public schooling and the inner cities and achievement gaps, etc, when that issue came squarely before the New Jersey Supreme Court when I was clerking there. Now I had a man who was akin to a professional mentor who was working for the New York City public schools. But audit?! I had no particular interest whatsoever in accounting, nor I thought, audit. But eventually I called this mentor and asked him whether he knew of any law or policy positions in the Department of Education that I might be good for, and he ended up convincing me to come over as his Assistant Auditor General. Four years later, I was the Auditor General, and I love being deeply engaged in the administration and oversight of the public schools. That said, it's still been a bit too much about budgets and balance sheets and finance, revenue and claiming, etc., for my taste.

I'm hopeful that this is changing a bit. Some of y'all may have seen me in the NY Times last Saturday - I'm going to be overseeing major new audit initiatives into our performance measures and data, including how schools award credit toward graduation, how schools administer and grade the state Regents' exams, and other ways in which schools may "juke" their stats to feign improvement and avoid accountability for failures. So that's pretty exciting. But if I were starting my career over again, I'd probably take a path more naturally designed to get myself into the thick of education policy. Maybe start with a sociology major, then Teach for America, then maybe additional graduate work in education policy and administration, possibly to become a principal and then a school district leader. But overall, I'm pretty okay with what I'm doing and am content to keep moving along this current career path.

Piney Boy
02-28-2011, 12:57 PM
For the job I have now, Software Engineer for the Navy, no. I love this job. This is the type of job I had envisioned when I was in college studying for my Information Systems degree. Yet when I graduated in 93 I could not get a job. So I had to go into Retail Management for 2 years. That I hated and would change in a heart beat. I had a programming job lined up, but it was to only pay me $8 an hour. That sucked.

Fresno Bob
02-28-2011, 02:28 PM
Try not to suck any d*cks on the way out to the parking lot today, Joe.

any more than twice a year and my bonus accelerators kick in!

SeaDogStat
02-28-2011, 05:53 PM
f**k no

My "career", such as it has been, has been disastrous.

Branching out into some new things to keep me sane.
Well, you're bartending now...

swampdragon
02-28-2011, 08:38 PM
I did it all over again basically-

Less than 2 years ago (at 46 years old) I started teaching middle school.

This is the hardest, happiest, most rewarding, most emotionally challenging, all encompassing, worst paying job that I have ever had - and I am substantially happier doing this compared to all of my past jobs.

8th graders are a very strange lovable bunch of humans and living with middle school and high school students in their world everyday is a long strange trip.

Kevin Seitzer
03-01-2011, 12:41 AM
I loved my job as an integrated circuit failure analysis engineer for the first eight years out of college. The eight years since then, not so much. Good bosses early on and some poor ones since then have made part of that difference, but I have a pretty good boss now and I'm still bored to tears with what I do. I wouldn't go back and do things differently because I wouldn't want to give up those first eight years or what I learned from that, but I'm still in the process of figuring out where I go from here.

I'd love to figure out how to turn my baseball research, analysis, and writing into a career that will support my family. I'm headed down that path, but I don't know exactly where the destination is. I'm kinda finding and writing my own new job description as I go, and maybe a few years from now I can take that job after I've created it. I hope. The one baseball job that exists now that I could probably do is as an analyst in a front office, but that doesn't particularly appeal to me. I want to impact how the game is understood and its information is processed, and working behind closed doors for one team is not the way to accomplish that. Not to mention the money is poor and the hours are long, neither of which cooperates very well with being engaged in the lives of my wife and children.

NakedRicci
03-01-2011, 01:13 AM
I would seriously rethink and change a boatload of future/career oriented choices starting circa 1989-90. I can't say I've got a bad job. A publishing editor with Wiley and Sons (the oldest publisher in the US) isn't a bad thing, but very few people get rich in publishing. I'd much prefer to have taken the chance and to have dived right into filmwork post college. I made the decision to get married right after college and it really restrained my attempts to pursue what had always been a professional dream. I am now working to kick start that part of my dream, but the average time it takes to establish oneself in the film industry is 10 years... I'm behind the curve and missed a lot of my prime. I wish I was a cup half full sort of guy, but I'm not. I'll always shake my head at the "what if" points in my life.

Cobain's Ghost
03-02-2011, 01:50 PM
hell yeah. computer programming = money for nothing.

Piney Boy
03-02-2011, 02:20 PM
hell yeah. computer programming = money for nothing.

Didn't know that is what Dire Straits was singing about.

Cobain's Ghost
03-02-2011, 02:21 PM
Didn't know that is what Dire Straits was singing about.

notice i left out "chicks for free". :p

NakedRicci
03-02-2011, 03:00 PM
notice i left out "chicks for free". :p

But that's why you get the money for nothing, so you can afford to buy (or rent) your chicks. ;)

Funkley
03-02-2011, 05:23 PM
I'm with amcg and I'll also say f**k no. Tired of corporate America, tired of working my ass off for idiots who piss those efforts away with poor decisions and then rinse/ repeat.

So many things I could have done better or different I hardly woild know where to start over but I would do it different, yes.

B-Fly
03-02-2011, 05:38 PM
Bah. Not one kid in the history of mankind ever said they wanted to be a systems analyst/accountant/sh!tty office job guy.

But it certainly allows for more workday internet bulletin board posting than archaeology.

Midnight Otter
03-02-2011, 05:55 PM
But it certainly allows for more workday internet bulletin board posting than archaeology.

Yeah, but if you got into archaeology,they give you a shovel and one of those little brooms!

Lurker765
03-02-2011, 07:02 PM
"When I was a little boy I wanted to be a baseball player and to join a circus. With the Yankees I've accomplished both"---Craig Nettles

"When I was a small boy in Kansas, a friend of mine and I went fishing. I told him I wanted to be a real Major League baseball player, a genuine professional like Honus Wagner. My friend said that he'd like to be president of the United States. Neither of us got our wish." ---Dwight D. Eisenhower